Advances in Microbial Physiology, Vol. 21 - download pdf or read online

By A.H. Rose and J. Gareth Morris (Eds.)

ISBN-10: 0120277212

ISBN-13: 9780120277216

This quantity in a research-level sequence covers different features of microbial body structure and biochemistry together with inositol metabolisms in yeasts, bacterial adhesion, natural acids, the bacterial flagellum and the mechanical behaviour of bacterial phone partitions. it's meant to be of use to microbiologists, biochemists and biotechnologists. different similar works during this sequence are volumes 29, 30 and 31.

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Read e-book online Advances in Microbial Physiology, Vol. 21 PDF

This quantity in a research-level sequence covers different features of microbial body structure and biochemistry together with inositol metabolisms in yeasts, bacterial adhesion, natural acids, the bacterial flagellum and the mechanical behaviour of bacterial phone partitions. it really is meant to be of use to microbiologists, biochemists and biotechnologists.

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1976a). Archives of‘Biochemistry and Biophysics 176, 214. Hildebrandt, A. and Sauer, H. W. (1976b). Roux’s Archives of Developmental Biology 180, 149. Hildebrandt, A. and Sauer, H. W. ( 1 9 7 6 ~ )Biochirnica . et ihphysica Acta 425, 3 16. Hildebrandt, A. and Sauer, H. W. (1977a). Biochmical and Biophysical Research Communications 74, 466. Hildebrandt, A. and Sauer, H. W. (1977b). Roux’s Archives of Developmental Biology 183, 107. , Mengel, R. and Sauer, H. W. (1979). eitschrijlf u r Natunuissenschuften, in press.

The activity of this factor (measured as stimulation of RNA polymerase I1 activity in vitro) gradually decreases during starvation to undetectable levels. From the evidence presently available it is difficult to judge if its activity, and hence its disappearance, is of consequence for one o r othei- o r both of the two RNA po lymerases. Taking into account all the observations outlined above, a picture of the regulation of transcription during differentiation emerges wherein the overall concentration of potentially active RNA polymerases I and I1 remains constant throughout starvation.

RNA Polymerase Very little is known so far about the importance of subunitmodification for the modulation of transcriptional activity in Physarum. D). This heterogeneity of the large subunit is reminiscent of the situation observed with RNA polymerases from other eukaryotic sources where polymerase IIA (the largest subunit has a molecular weight over 200,000) appears to be associated with resting, non-transcribing tissue whereas polymerase I I B (the largest subunit is smaller than 200,000 daltons) is predominantly found in actively growing tissue (Jendrisak and Guilfoyle, 1978).

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Advances in Microbial Physiology, Vol. 21 by A.H. Rose and J. Gareth Morris (Eds.)


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